10 Years Since Hurricane Katrina

ten_years_updated_time.jpgOn August 29, it will be 10 years since Hurricane Katrina made landfall on the Gulf Coast. A decade later, the hurricane remains a symbol why we work to confront the climate crisis: as the world warms, super-storms like Katrina will become all too common.

Katrina is also a reminder of the complex ways in which climate change overlaps with other forms of injustice. It’s no accident that those most impacted by Katrina were poor families of color. The criminalization of Black and Latino citizens, the displacement of poor communities by gentrification, and neglect by elected officials and government institutions all contributed to the pain, fear and trauma of the storm. In the ten years since, continued discrimination and systemic racism have made it hard for communities to recover. Reflecting on Katrina reminds us that fighting for climate justice means fighting for an economic and political system that offers dignity, security and freedom to all.

On August 29, we'll commemorate the 10 years that have passed since Hurricane Katrina with an event that will include video profiles documenting climate change in the Gulf South, a panel with climate and environmental justice leaders from organizations like Neighbor to Neighbor and Alternatives for Community and Environment, and a reception. This is a moment to reflect, discuss, and deepen our commitment to justice. Join us!

For more details and to RSVP: http://www.betterfutureproject.org/commemorating_hurricane_katrina


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